Why is Windows Vista bad?

Discussion in 'Computer Software and Operating Systems' started by WintendoZone, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. Pacheko17

    Pacheko17 かっこい男の子

    Member
    7
    Jan 31, 2015
    Brazil
    República Juliana
    Linux users have a habit of hating anything Microsoft does, and I have that too.
    Windows 10 is undeniably a better product than Vista. Doesn't mean it's any good, it's just better.
     
  2. Trash_Bandatcoot

    Trash_Bandatcoot Newbie

    Newcomer
    1
    Saturday
    Netherlands
    I’ve only read the title, but it’s simple:

    Vista is slow, it wasn’t ahead of it’s time and during development, it promised a lot.
    Remember Longhorn, the codename for Vista? From what I’ve heard, it was cancelled and the team had a little time to get things together, so they took thing from Longhorn, but not long as all the features that we’re promised. What we ended up with was a rushed and slow version of Windows, that everyone hates.
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  3. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

    Member
    11
    Dec 23, 2009
    Belgium
    Belgium
    Those who say vista is the worst clearly have never tried millennium. Now THAT was a bad operating system.

    Most of the things on vista have been mentioned (slow and buggy on release), but there's another factor. A few years before XP, the internet exploded in popularity. This lead to a whole new clientele of computer owners who had no clue how to actually use the system. And in turn, this lead to an industry of malware, adware, online virusses and so on (I think I was the only one in my family who had heard of "computer virus" before XP, and IIRC, the other terms were coined during XP's lifecycle). From the foundation, XP had lacking security.
    Vista had the unfortunate (but necessary) reputation of stopping that party. You weren't always an administrator anymore, and quite some people were annoyed at the operating system that they had to provide credentials all the time for e.g. allowing a program to write to the root drive (which programs shouldn't be using in the first place). 7 tuned down the "nazi security regime" a bit, but really: at that time most programs were updated to not do the sort of shenanigans that older programs sometimes did.



    I'm a windows user and I think that statement is ridiculous.
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  4. comput3rus3r

    comput3rus3r GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

    Member
    9
    Aug 20, 2016
    United States
    what's ridiculous is an OS that updates itself whether you want it or not.
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  5. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

    Member
    11
    Dec 23, 2009
    Belgium
    Belgium
    ...

    Okay, I can't argue with that logic. If you find that ridiculous, then by all means: be my guest. :)

    For the record, though, I'd like to mention that I'm a technician for a firm that...doesn't exactly have ICT on high priority. As such, it's not too uncommon to check users' computers and find that they've been ignoring the "updates are available: click here to install" mention from windows 7 FOR A WHOLE FREAKING YEAR. At least the ones on 10 don't have these sorts of vulnerabilities (those same persons usually don't go the extra mile of simply turning automatic updates off).
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  6. comput3rus3r

    comput3rus3r GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

    Member
    9
    Aug 20, 2016
    United States
    Why do you think users are ignoring the updates? could it be that often times the updates are breaking things instead of fixing them? as the old adage says "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

    I'm using windows 7 sp1 with updates off, defender off. no anti-virus. I install drivers,net framework ect. in a per need basis and my windows pc runs flawlessly. In contrast to my win10 laptop that I went out of my way to try to block the updates using video guides with multi step methods and low and behold nothing worked to turn off the updates which has interrupted my workflow many times including system crashes etc.. yes I find it ridiculous that the user has no control over the way the OS behaves. I've been using computers since about 1989 so I grew up using windows. The only good thing about windows 10 is that it's not OSX even though it's trying to be.
     
    Last edited by comput3rus3r, Jul 17, 2018 at 1:21 PM
    WintendoZone likes this.
  7. sarkwalvein

    sarkwalvein There's hope for a Xenosaga port.

    Member
    17
    GBAtemp Patron
    sarkwalvein is a Patron of GBAtemp and is helping us stay independent!

    Our Patreon
    Jun 29, 2007
    Germany
    Niedersachsen
    In the one hand the first versions were not so good.
    In the other hand it was a technological transition period, most people still used old 32bits computers with not much more than 2GB of RAM, and compatibility with old software wasn't so good, driver support also wasn't as good as it could be, and generally XP and the old applications performed better on the old hardware of the day... with the transition completed all of that doesn't really matter anymore.

    Congrats. Good for you buddy. /s
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  8. ryguy2010

    ryguy2010 Member

    Newcomer
    1
    Mar 8, 2018
    United States
    Want to know the real reason Vista was a bust. You can blame XP SP2. They pulled all the resources from the Longhorn team, to get that patch out.
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  9. x65943

    x65943 Dr. Rabbi Prince X, Sr., Ed. D.

    Moderator
    11
    GBAtemp Patron
    x65943 is a Patron of GBAtemp and is helping us stay independent!

    Our Patreon
    Jun 23, 2014
    United States
    Midwest
    I think he is saying that, as a Linux user, he is super out of the loop on Windows BUT even he knows windows 10 is better than Vista.
     
    WintendoZone likes this.
  10. comput3rus3r

    comput3rus3r GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

    Member
    9
    Aug 20, 2016
    United States
    thanks. /s
     
  11. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

    Member
    11
    Dec 23, 2009
    Belgium
    Belgium
    Can't speak on behalf of users outside the ones I know, but over here it's always "I was going to, but I had a job to do". Which is kind of obvious, as that is what they're getting payed for.

    A windows update breaking anything has only happened once in my life. I'm very willing to admit it was a large one (it broke network, keyboard, USB and mousepad support for some reason), but compared to the literally hundreds of PC's I've updated (if I count individual windows update processes, it's far over the thousand) that's pretty weak.

    My father used to be one of those "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". Then he became a "when it's broke, let my son fix it". The reason: his refusal to update the free virusscanner I installed for him or clicking 'accept' to download updates netted him two or three hundred kinds of malware on a single PC (yes, they were mostly clones of the same one. It was still a huge-ass number). That refusal to interrupt his workflow for...maybe 5 minutes all months of using it total cost me two or three hours to properly clean.

    Don't get me wrong: I'm not attacking you nor your choice (okay...maybe a bit. I wouldn't dare keeping a shred of data I might need later on your PC). If you grew up using computers, you probably know - like me - what to avoid and what to use. However, considering that we're talking about an operating system - which should be usable to the average user* - then there are different standards.



    *meaning: downright dolts
     
    WintendoZone and comput3rus3r like this.
  12. comput3rus3r

    comput3rus3r GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

    Member
    9
    Aug 20, 2016
    United States
    I agree and I must admit that my method works for me because I know how to do things safely, where the average user would probably end up with viruses.
     
    WintendoZone and Taleweaver like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice